Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Curtiss Hawk Nurmoila, 1943.10.18


Curtiss Hawk Nurmoila, 1943.10.18
@SA-photo
Curtiss Hawk photo gallery is open mainsite : Curtiss Hawk


Curtiss Hawk photo gallery is open mainsite : Curtiss Hawk


Curtiss Hawk photo gallery is open mainsite : Curtiss Hawk

Finland use

After the fall of France, Germany agreed to sell captured Curtiss Hawk fighters to Finland in October 1940. In total, 44 captured aircraft of five subtypes were sold to Finland with three deliveries from 23 June 1941 – 5 January 1944. Not all were from the French stocks, 13 were initially sold to Norway and captured when the Germans conquered that country.[10] The aircraft were given serial codes CU-501 to CU-507 (A-4 submodel with Cyclone) and CU-551 to CU-587 (all other submodels with Twin Wasp).

In Finnish service, the Hawk was well liked, affectionately called Sussu ("Sweetheart"). The Finnish Air Force enjoyed success with the type, credited with 190⅓ kills by 58 pilots, between 16 July 1941 and 27 July 1944, for the loss of 15 of their own.[9] Finnish ace Kyösti Karhila scored 12¼ of his 32¼ victories in the Hawk, while the top Hawk ace K. Tervo scored 14¼ victories.
The Finnish Hawks were initially armed with either four or six 7.5mm machine guns. While sufficient during the early phase of the Continuation War, the increasing speeds and armor of Soviet aircraft soon showed this armament was not powerful enough. From 1942, the State Aircraft Factory replaced the fuselage machine guns with either one or two .50 in (12.7 mm) Colt machine guns and installed two or four .303 in (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns in each wing. The 12.7mm Berezin UB or LKk/42 heavy machine guns were also used.[9] The installation of heavier armament did not change the very good flying characteristics of the fighter, but the armament was much more effective against Soviet aircraft. The Finnish Hawks were also equipped with Revi 3D or C/12D gunsight.
Surviving Finnish aircraft remained in service with the FAF aviation units HLeLv 13, HLeLv 11 and LeSK until 30 August 1948, when the last operational Finnsh Hawks were put into storage. In 1953, the stored aircraft were scrapped.

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Monday, November 10, 2014

Panzerkampfwagen III : Kiestinki eastside 1941.10.12

One of tanks give support fire when others attack.
Panzerkampfwagen III : Kiestinki eastside 1941.10.12


The Germans took responsibility for the 500 km (310 mi) stretch of the front in northern Finland consisting of Finnish Lapland. The Finnish army was now much stronger than it had been during the Winter War, now boasting 475,000 men. The artillery, too, was relatively strong. However, there was only one tank battalion and a lack of motorized transportation

Thursday, November 6, 2014

StuG III : Tienhaara,Hanhijoki 1944.06.23


Waiting attack order.
StuG III : Tienhaara,Hanhijoki 1944.06.23
SA-photo

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Junkers Ju 88 : Gulf of Finland 1944.06.16

LeLv 44:n Junkers Ju 88 A-4, JK-265

 Junkers Ju 88 : Gulf of Finland  1944.06.16
Dive-bomming enemy.
@SA-photo

Junkers Ju 88 : Gulf of Finland  1944.06.16
Dive-bomming enemy.
@SA-photo

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-2 MT-214

 Messerschmitt's arrive in Finland. They are still Germany marks.

Same Messerschmitt  in Finnish colors.

Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-2 MT-214

Monday, November 3, 2014

Siebel ferry : Lahdenpohja 1942.08.01


Almost every  8.8 cm Flak are white rings from  Shoot down the enemy the aircraft.
 Lahdenpohja 1942.08.01
SA-photo (old caption)

Almost every  8.8 cm Flak are white rings from  Shoot down the enemy the aircraft.
 Lahdenpohja 1942.08.01
SA-photo (old caption)

Almost every  8.8 cm Flak are white rings from  Shoot down the enemy the aircraft.
 Lahdenpohja 1942.08.01
SA-photo (old caption)

Almost every  8.8 cm Flak are white rings from  Shoot down the enemy the aircraft.
 Lahdenpohja 1942.08.01
SA-photo (old caption)

Siebel ferry

(wikipedia text )
The Siebel ferry (Siebelfähre) was a shallow-draft catamaran landing craft operated by Germany's Wehrmacht during World War II. It served a variety of roles (transport, flak ship, gunboat, convoy escort, minelayer) in the Mediterranean, Baltic and Black Seas as well as along the English Channel. They were originally developed for Operation Sea Lion, Germany's planned but never-executed 1940 invasion of England. Siebel ferries continued performing useful service even after the war's end in 1945.

Sunday, November 2, 2014

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Finnish minelayer Ruotsinsalmi. 1942.08.12


Finnish minelayer Ruotsinsalmi. 1942.08.12
@SA-photo

Finnish minelayer Ruotsinsalmi


Ruotsinsalmi was a minelayer of the Finnish Navy and the namesake of her class. Ruotsinsalmi was commissioned in 1940 and remained in service until 1975. The vessel was named after the battle of Ruotsinsalmi, which was fought between Sweden and Russia in 1790.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

T-38 : Niinisalo HK 1942.07.01


Niinisalo HK 1942.07.01
SA-photo

The T-38 amphibious scout tank was a Soviet amphibious light tank that saw service in World War II.

Monday, October 27, 2014

Letov Š-18 (Smolik) : Kokkola-Kauhava 1943.07.22


Letov Š-18 (Smolik) : Kokkola-Kauhava 1943.07.22


Letov Š-18


The Letov Š-18 was a Czechoslovak single-engined, two-seat biplane trainer. It was designed by Alois Smolík at Letov Kbely. Š-18 first flew in 1925.

The aircraft was quite successful and sold well both to private pilots and to flight clubs. Apart from the basic variant there was also still the type Š-118, which was equipped with a Walter NZ-85 engine (85 hp, 63 KW). Some machines were exported to Bulgaria. The Czechoslovakian Air Force used the type 1925 to 1930 as a beginner trainer aircraft.

A complete reconstruction of the fuselage led to the Š-218, which had a steel tube frame and was equipped with a Walter NZ-120 engine (120 hp, 88 KW). The first flight of this type took place in 1926.

In 1929, one Š-218 Smolik was presented at Helsinki International Air Show. The Finnish Air Force showed interest in the type and purchased it in March, 1930, in order to test it. Nine more were soon ordered along with the manufacturing license. The nine aircraft ordered from Czechoslovakia arrived to Kauhava Aviation School in May–June, 1931. The Finnish State Aircraft Factory manufactured 29 slightly modified aircraft in three series. The first ten were ready in 1933, the second series of ten aircraft were ready in 1935, and nine more in 1936. The Finnish version, which was equipped with a Bramo radial engine of 145 hp (110 kW) could develop a maximum speed of 155 km/h (83 knots, 96 mph). The type was in service with the Finnish Air Force as a primary trainer between 1930 - 1945. One aircraft is still preserved at the Finnish Aviation museum in Vantaa and one replica is being built in Finland (as of 2005).

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

building a service road n the wilderness :Lutto 1942.07.21

Lutto 1942.07.21
@SA-photo
Lutto 1942.07.21
@SA-photo
Lutto 1942.07.21
@SA-photo
Lutto 1942.07.21
@SA-photo

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Fiat G.50 : little nap

More photos for Fiat G.50

Fiat G.50 is a single seat all metal construction fighter plane. It's powered by a 14 cylinder Fiat radial engine. Armament consists of 2 12.7 (.50cal) Breda-SAFAT MG's
Top speed was approximately 260mph at 16 500 ft altitude

The Finnish Air Force operated 33 Fiat G.50 aircraft - the first ones were operational already during the Winter War. 11 kills were achieved by LeLv 26 during the Winter War, and 88 additional kills were achieved during the Continuation War. Last kill on Feb 13 1944

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Fokker D.XXI : Nurmoila's airfield 1943.10.18

Fokker D.XXI :  Nurmoila's airfield 1943.10.18
@SA-photo

 Fokker D.XXI


The Fokker D.XXI performed better and for much longer in the Finnish Air Force, which had acquired a number of licence-built fighters prior to the start of the Winter War. Against the aircraft of the Soviet Air Force, the Fokker was more evenly matched, and its rugged design with a radial engine and fixed undercarriage made it very suitable for Finnish conditions. Later in the war, as newer models of Soviet fighters appeared, the Fokker D.XXI was underpowered and too lightly armed (with only four 7.92 mm/.312 in machine guns) to compete. Plans to arm the Fokkers with 20 mm cannons were dropped and only one fighter was armed as such (two 20 mm cannons and two 7.92 mm/.312 in machine guns). Another fighter was equipped with retractable landing gear, but due to less than anticipated performance improvement, wasn't continued in the series. During the Continuation War (1941–44) the Finnish State Aircraft Factory (Valtion Lentokonetehdas, VL) also built some 50 D.XXIs with the Swedish-built Pratt & Whitney R-1535 Twin Wasp Junior as the Bristol Mercury was in short supply. These can be identified by their longer cockpit glazing, smooth cowl, and large ventral air intake under the cowl. The fixed undercarriage lent itself to both unimproved runways and conversion to skis for winter use, both of which were advantages in the Finnish theater.
Several Finnish Air Force pilots became fighter aces with the Fokker D.XXI. The top scoring Fokker ace was Jorma Sarvanto who obtained 12 5/6 victories with the type. Many other future aces scored at least one victory with the Fokker. The highest scoring airframe was FK-110, with 10 victories. This aircraft survived the war and is on display at the Central Finland Aviation Museum.

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Curtiss P-36 Hawk : 1943.10.18

Curtiss P-36 Hawk : 1943.10.18
@SA-photo
 Curtiss P-36 Hawk : 1943.10.18
@SA-photo
 Curtiss P-36 Hawk : 1943.10.18
@SA-photo
 Curtiss P-36 Hawk : 1943.10.18
@SA-photo

Curtiss P-36 Hawk  Finland service

After the fall of France, Germany agreed to sell captured Curtiss Hawk fighters to Finland in October 1940. In total, 44 captured aircraft of five subtypes were sold to Finland with three deliveries from 23 June 1941 – 5 January 1944. Not all were from the French stocks, 13 were initially sold to Norway and captured when the Germans conquered that country. The aircraft were given serial codes CU-501 to CU-507 (A-4 submodel with Cyclone) and CU-551 to CU-587 (all other submodels with Twin Wasp).

In Finnish service, the Hawk was well liked, affectionately called Sussu ("Sweetheart"). The Finnish Air Force enjoyed success with the type, credited with 190⅓ kills by 58 pilots, between 16 July 1941 and 27 July 1944, for the loss of 15 of their own.Finnish ace Kyösti Karhila scored 12¼ of his 32¼ victories in the Hawk, while the top Hawk ace K. Tervo scored 14¼ victories.

The Finnish Hawks were initially armed with either four or six 7.5mm machine guns. While sufficient during the early phase of the Continuation War, the increasing speeds and armor of Soviet aircraft soon showed this armament was not powerful enough. From 1942, the State Aircraft Factory replaced the fuselage machine guns with either one or two .50 in (12.7 mm) Colt machine guns and installed two or four .303 in (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns in each wing. The 12.7mm Berezin UB or LKk/42 heavy machine guns were also used. The installation of heavier armament did not change the very good flying characteristics of the fighter, but the armament was much more effective against Soviet aircraft. The Finnish Hawks were also equipped with Revi 3D or C/12D gunsight.

Surviving Finnish aircraft remained in service with the FAF aviation units HLeLv 13, HLeLv 11 and LeSK until 30 August 1948, when the last operational Finnsh Hawks were put into storage. In 1953, the stored aircraft were scrapped

Monday, October 6, 2014

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Bristol Blenheim : refueling Tikkakoski, Luonetjärvi 1944.03.00

Bristol Blenheim : refueling
Tikkakoski, Luonetjärvi 1944.03.00

@SA-photo

Bristol Blenheim

In 1936, the Finnish Air Force ordered 18 Blenheim Mk Is from Britain and two years later, they obtained a manufacturing license for the aircraft. Before any aircraft could be manufactured at the Valtion lentokonetehdas (State Airplane Factory) in Finland, the Winter War broke out, forcing the Finns to order more aircraft from the UK. A further 24 British-manufactured Blenheims were ordered during the Winter War. After the Winter War, 55 Blenheims were constructed in Finland, bringing the total number to 97 aircraft (75 Mk Is and 22 Mk IVs).
The Finns also received 20 half-completed ex-Yugoslavian Mk IV Blenheims captured by Germany, together with manufacturing tools and production equipment, as well as a huge variety of spare parts. Yugoslavia had ceased production of the Mk I and commenced a production run of Mk IVs just prior to the April 1941 invasion.
The Finnish Blenheims flew 423 missions during the Winter War, and close to 3,000 missions during the Continuation War and Lapland War. Blenheim machine-gunners also shot down eight Soviet aircraft. Thirty-seven Blenheims were lost in combat during the wars.
After the war, Finland was prohibited from flying bomber aircraft by the Paris Peace Treaty, with Finland's Blenheims being placed into storage in 1948. However, in 1951, five Blenheims were re-activated for use as target tugs, with the last flight of a Finnish Blenheim taking place on 20 May 1958.

Monday, September 29, 2014

T-37A : 1941.09.05

1941.09.05
SA-photo

T-37A

The T-37A was a Soviet amphibious light tank. The tank is often referred to as the T-37, although that designation was used by a different tank which never left the prototype stage.The T-37A was the first series of mass-produced fully amphibious tanks in the world.

The tank was first created in 1932, based on the British Vickers tankette and other operational amphibious tanks. The tank was mass-produced starting in 1933 up until 1936, when it was replaced with the more modern T-38, based on the T-37A. Overall, after four years of production, 2552 T-37A’s were produced, including the original prototypes.

In the Red Army, they were used to perform tasks in communication, reconnaissance, and as defense units on the march, as well as active infantry support on the battlefield. The T-37A were used in large numbers during the Soviet invasion of Poland and in the Winter War against Finland. The T-37 A was also used by the Soviets in the beginning of the Great Patriotic War, but most of them were quickly lost. Surviving tanks of that type fought on the front lines until 1944, and were used in training and auxiliary defense until the end of World War II.

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Friday, September 26, 2014

Fiat G.50


More photos for Fiat G.50

Fiat G.50 is a single seat all metal construction fighter plane. It's powered by a 14 cylinder Fiat radial engine. Armament consists of 2 12.7 (.50cal) Breda-SAFAT MG's
Top speed was approximately 260mph at 16 500 ft altitude

The Finnish Air Force operated 33 Fiat G.50 aircraft - the first ones were operational already during the Winter War. 11 kills were achieved by LeLv 26 during the Winter War, and 88 additional kills were achieved during the Continuation War. Last kill on Feb 13 1944

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Brewster F2A - BW-355


MORE  Brewster F2A photos. 

Finnish company Nokia donated sufficient funds for the FAF to purchase a B-239. In return, the word NOKA was inscribed on BW-355. Operated by No. 24 Squadron, it was destroyed on 24 October 1944.